Lighting PT4

In the previous posts we’ve been talking about how to create camera looks that really pop. In the last post, LIGHTING PT3 we talked about our lighting design/focus and we got more great advice from Dan McKenrick.

The fourth piece of advice is to consider the color temperature of your lighting instruments and other objects that transmit light in your room (like projectors and windows).

My layman’s definition of color temperature is, “color temperature is the hue cast by a light source when representing white.” Read more

Lighting PT3

In the previous posts we’ve been talking about how to create camera looks that really pop. It all starts with your YOUR SET and then lighting. In the last post, LIGHTING PT2 we talked about learning to use our tools and we got more great advice from Dan McKenrick.

The third piece of advice Dan offers is, “don’t try so hard!”

Basically, when it comes to lighting in the church for video cameras we would do well to follow the KISS adage (keep it simple stupid). Read more

Lighting PT2

In the previous posts we began a discussion about how to create camera looks that really pop. It all starts with your YOUR SET and then lighting. In the last post, LIGHTING PT1 we talked about safety and I introduced you to Dan McKenrick.

The second piece of advice Dan offers is “learn how to use our tools.”

Dan suggests taking down a bunch of lights onto the ground, plug them in on the floor and work with them. How do you focus an ellipsoidal or a fresnel? How do you adjust the intensity of a light?  Can the light output be shaped? What beam width at a given distance will each type of light produce? All these things are best learned when not on a ladder or on a scissor lift but on the floor when you have time to play with and learn your gear. And while you have the lights on the floor, give them a cleaning.

In LIGHTING PT3 we’ll talk about our lighting design.

 

Lighting PT1

In the previous post, YOUR SET,  we began a discussion about how to create camera looks that really pop. It all starts with your set, but next comes lighting!

A few years ago I was video engineering a corporate presentation at the Sheraton New York Grand Ballroom. Though-out my career I’ve probably done a hundred shows at this location. This job was a piece of cake, we could do it in our sleep.

After I completed setting up the carrypack, cameras and doing a preliminary white balance / shading the client strolled by and began staring at the control room monitors. He turned to me with a worried look on his face and said, “these cameras look awful!” and then “can you fix them?” Sheepishly I responded, “sure, let me see what I can do.”

I knew fully well there was nothing wrong with the cameras. The Lighting Designer, a personal friend of the client, was still working on the lighting and I hoped that once he dialed in his lights everything would be ok.

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